Glove and Bat

The Top 8 LA Dodgers Legends Who Dominated the Field

Top 10 LA Dodgers Baseball Players of All Time

Introducing the

Top 10 LA Dodgers Baseball Players of All Time! Baseball is one of America’s favorite sports, and the Los Angeles Dodgers have a rich history filled with incredible players. This list is not definitive, but it showcases some of the team’s best players who have left an unforgettable mark on the sport.

From pitching to hitting, these players have shown excellence in their craft. 1.

Clayton Kershaw

At number one is Clayton Kershaw – one of the best pitchers in the league. Kershaw has a WAR of 68.6, seven All-Star selections, three Cy Young Awards, and an MVP.

In 2011, he attained the pitching Triple Crown, a feat that only four other pitchers have achieved in the past century. Kershaw is known for his devastating curveball, but his fastball and slider are just as lethal.

His career ERA of 2.43 is the lowest among active players, and his presence on the mound is a nightmare for opposing batters. 2.

Pee Wee Reese

Pee Wee Reese, a Hall of Famer, makes the second spot on this list with a WAR of 66.3. Reese won a World Series championship in 1955 and made ten All-Star teams throughout his career. He’s famous for his iconic moment when he embraced Jackie Robinson on the field, showing support for the first African American player in the league.

3. Sandy Koufax

Sandy Koufax lands at number three with a WAR of 53.2. Koufax won three Cy Young Awards and an MVP before retiring at the age of 30 due to an injury.

During his short but dominant career, Koufax threw four no-hitters, one of which was a perfect game. His performance in the 1965 World Series was legendary, pitching three complete-game shutouts, which led the Dodgers to clinch the championship.

4. Jackie Robinson

Jackie Robinson, the first African American player in the league, lands at number four with a WAR of 61.3. Robinson won the Rookie of the Year award in 1947 and captured the NL MVP award in 1949.

He was a six-time All-Star and won a World Series title in 1955. Robinson is an essential figure in baseball history for his courage and perseverance in breaking down the color barrier.

5. Duke Snider

Duke Snider lands in the fifth spot with a WAR of 67.5. Snider played for the Dodgers and won two World Series titles during his career.

Home runs were Snider’s specialty, and he led the league in that category twice. He also produced many runs batted in and extra-base hits during his career.

6. Don Drysdale

Don Drysdale achieved a WAR of 67.4, making him a solid choice for the sixth spot.

Drysdale won the Cy Young award in 1962 and made eight All-Star teams. He led the league in hit batters three times and was a strikeout leader twice.

Drysdale was also known for his incredibly durable arm, pitching more than 300 innings on three different occasions. 7.

Zack Wheat

Zack Wheat comes in at the seventh spot with a WAR of 60.2. Wheat led the league in hits four times and won a batting title in 1918. He was also a doubles and triples machine and scored over 100 runs in seven different seasons.

8. Dazzy Vance

Dazzy Vance produced a WAR of 52.7 making him an excellent choice for the eighth spot.

Vance won MVP honors in 1924 and led the league in strikeouts thrice. He was also an ERA leader and threw over 200 innings for 11 straight seasons.

9. Don Sutton

Don Sutton makes the ninth spot with a WAR of 58.8. Sutton played for the Dodgers and was a four-time All-Star.

He amassed over 300 victories throughout his career and holds several franchise records, including most wins and innings pitched. 10.

Gil Hodges

Finally, Gil Hodges lands at the tenth spot with a WAR of 43.1. Hodges won a World Series championship in 1955 and was a prolific home run hitter. He also won a Gold Glove award and is remembered for his contributions as a first baseman.

Introducing Clayton Kershaw

Clayton Kershaw is one of the best players in LA Dodgers history. Let’s dive into his early career and achievements.

Pitching Triple Crown, Cy Young, and All-Star

In 2011, Kershaw won the pitching Triple Crown, led the league in wins, strikeouts, and ERA. That year, he also won his first Cy Young award.

Kershaw has since gone on to win two more Cy Young awards, in 2013 and 2014, respectively. He has also earned seven All-Star selections, the most recent being in 2021.

Dominant Period from 2012-2017

Kershaw’s performance between 2012-2017 cemented his status as one of the league’s best pitchers. During this period, he led the league in ERA four times and won the National League MVP in 2014.

Additionally, Kershaw was named an All-Star in each of those six seasons and led the league in strikeouts three times. He’s also been a Gold Glove award winner and has helped lead the Dodgers to multiple playoff appearances.

Conclusion

The LA Dodgers have a rich history filled with iconic players. From Clayton Kershaw to Jackie Robinson, each of these players has left an unforgettable mark on the sport.

They have inspired generations of fans and have shown that with hard work and dedication, anything is possible.

3) Pee Wee Reese

When it comes to the best shortstops in LA Dodgers history, Pee Wee Reese’s name is often at the top of the list. With a career spanning over 16 seasons for the Dodgers, Reese was a vital player in the team’s success.

Let’s dive into his early career and contributions to the franchise.

Early Career and All-Star Status

Reese made his Dodgers debut in 1940 and didn’t take long to solidify his spot as a starter. By 1942, he had earned his first All-Star selection and would go on to make the All-Star team nine more times throughout his career.

Reese was known for his excellent fielding skills as well as his knack for getting on base. He had a career batting average of .269 and reached 200 hits in a season twice.

Reese was also a great baserunner, stealing 232 bases throughout his career.

Contributions to the Franchise

Reese’s contributions to the LA Dodgers franchise went beyond his individual achievements. He played in 2,166 games for the Dodgers, amassed 8,058 at-bats, and had 2,170 hits.

Reese also crossed home plate 1,338 times, walked 1,210 times, and was part of the Dodgers’ first World Series championship team in 1955. Reese’s impact went beyond his performance on the field, as he was known for his excellent leadership skills.

He became a team captain and led the Dodgers’ clubhouse. Reese also took a stand for Jackie Robinson, the first African American player in the league, by stepping up and embracing him on the field during a particularly difficult time.

This event was an essential moment in baseball history and solidified Reese’s role as a true leader on and off the field.

4) Sandy Koufax

Sandy Koufax is one of the most iconic pitchers in baseball history, and his dominant career with the LA Dodgers is unforgettable. From his early struggles to his rise to success, and his dominance from 1963-1966, let’s take a closer look at Koufax’s remarkable career.

Early Struggles and Rise to Success

When Koufax first arrived in the league, he struggled with his control, leading to a rocky start to his career. However, his incredible pitching talent became evident soon enough.

In 1961, Koufax set a single-game record by striking out 18 batters, and in 1962, he set a new major league record by striking out 14 batters in a World Series game. These performances earned Koufax his first All-Star selection and marked the beginning of his rise to success.

By 1963, Koufax had taken his pitching to the next level. He led the league in strikeouts and ERA, winning his first Cy Young Award.

From 1963-1966, Koufax was simply dominant, winning three more Cy Young Awards and leading the league in strikeouts each year. He was also named the National League MVP in 1963.

Dominance from 1963-1966 and Retirement

During his dominant period, Koufax threw four no-hitters, one of which was a perfect game. In 1965, he threw three complete-game shutouts in the World Series, leading the Dodgers to their third championship in seven years.

Koufax played a significant role in the Dodgers’ success during this time, and his dominance on the mound was admired by fans and players alike. Unfortunately, Koufax’s career was cut short due to arthritis, and he announced his retirement before the 1967 season started.

Despite his brief career, Koufax’s impact on baseball is still significant. He was the first player to win three Cy Young Awards in a row, and he still holds several Dodgers’ pitching records.

In 1972, Koufax was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame, a fitting tribute to one of the greatest pitchers in baseball history.

5) Jackie Robinson

Jackie Robinson is known for breaking the color barrier in baseball and paving the way for future generations of players. His courage and perseverance in the face of adversity made him an essential figure in baseball history.

Let’s take a closer look at his career highlights and contributions to the LA Dodgers franchise.

Breaking Color Barrier and Rookie of the Year

In 1947, Robinson made his Dodgers debut as the first African American player in the league. This marked a significant turning point in baseball history, and Robinson met resistance from fans, players, and even teammates.

Despite this, Robinson excelled on the field, earning the Rookie of the Year award in his first season.

Contributions to Franchise and Career Highlights

Robinson went on to have an outstanding career with the Dodgers, earning six All-Star selections, the National League MVP award in 1949, and helping the Dodgers win a World Series championship in 1955. He became a two-time stolen bases leader and led the league in batting average in 1949, hitting .342.

Robinson was a talented player who could impact the game in many ways, both on the basepaths and in the field. Robinson’s impact on the Dodgers franchise went beyond his individual achievements.

He helped lead the Dodgers to six World Series appearances and earned the respect and admiration of fans and players around the league. Robinson was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1962, and his number 42 was retired by the league in 1997.

6) Duke Snider

Duke Snider was a prolific power hitter during his time with the LA Dodgers and was an essential player in the franchise’s success. From his power hitting and All-Star status to his franchise records and World Series victories, let’s take a closer look at Snider’s remarkable career.

Power Hitting and All-Star Status

Snider was known for his impressive power hitting and was a seven-time All-Star during his career with the Dodgers. He led the league in home runs twice, with a career-high of 43 in 1956.

Snider was also a great run producer, leading the league in runs batted in twice and producing many extra-base hits.

Franchise Records and World Series Victories

Snider’s contributions to the Dodgers went beyond his power hitting abilities. He played in a total of 1,703 games for the franchise, recording 6,602 at-bats, 1,480 runs, and a .295 batting average.

Snider also holds several franchise records, including the most home runs, runs batted in, and extra-base hits. Snider was also part of the Dodgers’ World Series championship teams in 1955 and 1959, contributing to their success both on and off the field.

He was a beloved player by fans and teammates alike and is remembered as one of the greatest players in team history. In 1980, Snider was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame, capping off an outstanding career.

7) Don Drysdale

Don Drysdale was known for his incredible pitching abilities and his contributions to the success of the LA Dodgers franchise. From his early career success to his achievements and Dodger legacy, let’s take a closer look at this Hall of Famer’s remarkable career.

Early Career Success and All-Star Status

Drysdale entered the league in 1956 and, by 1958, was already an All-Star. He was also leading the league in strikeouts and was establishing himself as one of the top pitchers in the game.

Drysdale was a shutout machine as well, throwing seven shutouts during his rookie season. The following season, he led the league in strikeouts, complete games, and innings pitched.

Achievements and Dodger Legacy

Drysdale continued to dominate throughout his career, earning three consecutive Cy Young awards from 1962 to 1964. He holds the Dodgers franchise record for most innings pitched, games started, and strikeouts.

Drysdale is also the Dodgers’ all-time leader in hit batters, even leading the league in this category five times during his career. Drysdale’s legacy with the Dodgers franchise is impressive and significant.

He was a part of four World Series championship teams and helped lead the Dodgers to eight playoff appearances. He was known for his durability, pitching over 200 innings in 11 straight seasons.

Drysdale was also a remarkable teammate, often mentoring younger players and providing valuable leadership.

8) Zack Wheat

Zack Wheat was a prolific hitter during his time with the LA Dodgers and is remembered as one of the greatest players in franchise history. From his prolific hitting and batting champion status to his Dodger legacy and franchise records, let’s take a closer look at this Hall of Famer’s remarkable career.

Prolific Hitting and Batting Champion Status

Wheat was a hitting machine throughout his career, recording over 2,800 hits and leading the league in hits four times. He was a batting champion in

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